Transcript of Video: “Vermont Long-Term Care Ombudsman Project”

[Opening screen with Vermont Legal Aid logo and text: Vermont Long-Term Care Ombudsman Project.]

[A grey-haired senior named Leo sits on his bed at a senior home, holding a cane. His art work is on the wall. Light piano music plays. In the corner of the video is some text: Need help? Call 1-800-889-2047. Leo speaks to the camera.]

Leo: My name is Leo, as you can see around you, looks like I'm an artist.

Well, I felt so frustrated because my daughter lives in Canada, my son lives in Florida, nobody to help me. I'm 83 years old, didn't know what to do, I mean bills were piling up here and there, every little bit of money I had, they wanted it. I heard about the Legal Aid Ombudsman program. It's the best thing ever happened to me.

[Woman speaks to the camera. There are house plants in the background. She is identified as Wendy Rowe of the Vermont Long-Term Care Ombudsman Project at Vermont Legal Aid.]

Wendy: The word ombudsman means advocate, it means problem solver and that's what we do.

[Wendy speaks to Leo while looking at some paperwork.]

Wendy: You should just pay this for now.

Leo: Yeah.

Leo’s voice: Wendy was a miracle, she really was. Sometimes I wonder if I didn't have some help from someone I don't know if I'd be here today.

[Another woman speaks into the camera. A window and plants are seen behind her. She is identified as Susan Alexander of Vermont Long-Term Care Ombudsman Project at Vermont Legal Aid.]

Susan: The Vermont Long-Term Care Ombudsman project is a group of highly trained advocates that cover all parts of the state.

[Images of Leo and Wendy speaking in his room at the senior home.]

Susan’s voice: And they promote rights for those people receiving long-term care services in Vermont.

Leo’s voice: This organization is there to help people in my situation.

Susan’s voice: You know, we're providing services to people who otherwise would really not have a voice.

Leo’s voice: Senior citizens don't want to be forgotten either.

[Wendy speaks to the camera.]

Wendy: That fundamental right that we all have to be treated with respect and dignity.

[Man in shirt and tie speaks to the camera. He is identified as Sean Londergan, the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman at Vermont Legal Aid.]

Sean: They have a right to make decisions. They have a right to have control over their lives.

[More images of Leo and Wendy speaking in his room at the senior home.]

Wendy’s voice: Well I think we're dealing with one of the most vulnerable populations, elders and disabled people. You know focusing on quality of life issues is really what it's all about. Listening and identifying the problem and then beginning what we call a complaint investigation.

[Susan speaks to the camera.]

Susan: We are trained in complaint resolution.

[Images of Wendy in her office on the phone.]

Susan’s voice: We take our direction from our residents and our participants.

Wendy’s voice: Also important to know that we offer those services free of charge and are confidential.

[Leo speaks to the camera.]

Leo: Ombudsman. If you remember that, senior citizens, remember that.

[Susan speaks to the camera.]

Susan: We keep coming back every day and we'll continue to do that because it is incredibly fulfilling.

[Closing screen with the Vermont Legal Aid logo and the following text: Need help? Call 1-800-889-2047. www.VTLawHelp.org. Screening@vtlegalaid.org. Vermont Long-Term Care Ombudsman Project. Music: Kevin MacLeod, “Eternal Hope.”]

End of transcript.

 

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Updated: Oct 21, 2019